"The Material Form of Literacy Conversation: Encoding and Modeling Texts from Early to Mass Print"

Image
Image
February 15, 2013
3:30PM - 5:00PM
Location
Room 165 Thompson Library

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2013-02-15 15:30:00 2013-02-15 17:00:00 "The Material Form of Literacy Conversation: Encoding and Modeling Texts from Early to Mass Print"

ANNUAL LECTURE IN THE HISTORY OF THE BOOK

Laura Mandell, Professor of English, Texas A&M

In this talk, I will discuss in detail relationships imagined to readers as writers in Pope, Gray, and Wordsworth, and how those relationships changed with the evolution of print from coterie to mass distribution.  I will demonstrate three different prototypes for encoding the Dunciads [sic.], Gray's "Elegy", and the Preludes [sic.] that bring into relief the struggles — unsuccessful struggles, I might add — in which Gray and Wordsworth were immersed because of print.  I conclude with an analysis of what Walter Ben Michaels misunderstood about Susan Howe's Emily Dickinson, arguing that Howe's understanding of Dickinson's fasicles captures what Michael's misses, a writerly antagonism to mass print insofar as it abrogates the possibility of literary conversation.  My hope in encoding eighteenth-century texts is that we can re-open via digital media the writers' "coterie" conversation for which eighteenth-century writers wished.   --Laura Mandell

Co-sponsored by LiteracyStudies@OSU, Digital Arts and Humanities Working Group, and OSU Libraries.

Room 165 Thompson Library Humanities Institute huminst@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

ANNUAL LECTURE IN THE HISTORY OF THE BOOK

Laura Mandell, Professor of English, Texas A&M

In this talk, I will discuss in detail relationships imagined to readers as writers in Pope, Gray, and Wordsworth, and how those relationships changed with the evolution of print from coterie to mass distribution.  I will demonstrate three different prototypes for encoding the Dunciads [sic.], Gray's "Elegy", and the Preludes [sic.] that bring into relief the struggles — unsuccessful struggles, I might add — in which Gray and Wordsworth were immersed because of print.  I conclude with an analysis of what Walter Ben Michaels misunderstood about Susan Howe's Emily Dickinson, arguing that Howe's understanding of Dickinson's fasicles captures what Michael's misses, a writerly antagonism to mass print insofar as it abrogates the possibility of literary conversation.  My hope in encoding eighteenth-century texts is that we can re-open via digital media the writers' "coterie" conversation for which eighteenth-century writers wished.   --Laura Mandell

Co-sponsored by LiteracyStudies@OSU, Digital Arts and Humanities Working Group, and OSU Libraries.